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Crosscut Sled

Miter Sled

Raised Panel Jig

Raised Panel Jig

This one is one of my more complex jigs. The intention was to create a tenoning jig with a micro adjust. I accomplished the goal for the most part. Though, I may need some further practice with it because it's pretty tricky to get accurate. I intentionally made the fence tall enough so that it could double as a panel raising jig, as well. So if it doesn't work out as a tenoning jig, it'll be a superb panel raiser.

It's made of some scrap 3/4" birch plywood and a little 5/8" MDF that I had laying around. I cut a couple bits of that same old t-track from Rockler to use as guide rails for the adjustments. I also picked up an Incra Miter Slider for this one, just because I was scared to death of the way I made the runner on the crosscut sled.

The slider works pretty good once you get it adjusted. I also put two toggle clamps on the face so I don't have to worry about holding the stock in place while I'm pushing through the saw. A few knobs that also came from the t-track from Rockler and a tough spring make up the bulk of the hardware on this little thing.

Essentially, the base holds the slider and three bits of t-track to help keep the fence parallel with the blade. The base is 3/4" birch ply. The fence is an L-shape where the base of the L is also 3/4" ply and the face is 5/8" MDF. I chose the MDF because I ran out of plywood. :-)

I routed very shallow dados in the base of the fence to mate with the 3 t-track runners and installed some non-stick tape that I got from rockler to help soften the movement as much as I could. I also notched out this base and created a U-shaped brace that allowed for some micro-adjustments.

This mechanism took a few tries to perfect. I didn't like the original design because the forces were being applied to the top of the face rather than down low and it kept tipping and made the motion very rough. This design puts the force right in the middle of the fence's base and makes motion very smooth. The spring counteracts the force so that I can adjust in either direction at any position on the travel of the fence.